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OMNISECURE 2019 – the next conference for smart identity solutions will take place in Berlin from 21st to 23rd January

Around 350 delegates will be participating in the 26th annual conference, which takes place under the patronage of the Federal Ministry of the Interior. The topics will include digital payment, blockchain, digital Europe, connected living, the digital economy and digital citizens.

On the eve of the conference (21st Jan.) delegates from the fields of industry, politics, research and public administration meet up for their first networking event. This is an evening when experts engage in an intensive exchange of ideas. A selection of start-ups will give short pitches with innovative ideas..

The programme for January 2019 will be accessible here from mid-October.

Avail of the favourable terms in our Participation + Hotel Package There are special conditions for participants from research institutions and public authorities.

Basic Data

350 participants | Over 100 top speakers | 22 large forums
12 tutorials and workshops | Discussion and networking on two long evenings


The Cybersecurity Act is part of the new social contract for the digital age. Therefore, we will bear the responsibility for drawing up fair provisions which uphold the interests of European citizens, Member States, European industry, the European Institutions and the digital single market. We must make sure that the process of establishing confidence in products through a new ENISA-led certification framework is beneficial, first and foremost, to European citizens.

With this vision in mind, Eurosmart invites both co-legislators to take 5 critical points into account when considering the initial proposal from the European Commission.
  • · Firstly, clear legal definitions of essential terms referring to IT and security ecosystems (aka “cybersecurity”).
  • · Secondly, fair and open European governance during the preparation phase of candidate European certification schemes.
  • · Thirdly, a well-defined European certification objective that is apt for each level of certification. Above all, the co-legislators should ensure that the ‘substantial’ and ‘high’ levels require mandatory penetration testing (“pentest” or “ethical hacking”) of the product by Conformity Assessment bodies (CABs) whilst a product is being evaluated.
  • · Fourthly, European standards must be the basisfor the preparation of a new candidate European certification scheme.
  • · And finally ENISA’s “Intellectual Property Rights” (IPR policy) should be spelled out in the Cybersecurity act.

Download the position paper

eurosmart.com